DESKTOP
TABLET (max. 1024px)
MOBILE (max. 640px)
Return to Top
Ludwig Van
Toronto Montreal

MAJOR CHORDS | WebMD Diagnoses Our Favourite Opera Characters

By Michael Vincent on May 8, 2019

A scene from the Canadian Opera Company’s production of La Bohème, 2019. (Photo: Michael Cooper)
A scene from the Canadian Opera Company’s production of La Bohème, 2019. (Photo: Michael Cooper)

Opera characters express a myriad of medical symptoms during the unfolding of a juicy and sorted opera. We thought we’d input some of these symptoms and see what WebMD would come up with. The results (taken with a grain of salt) showed results, including possible ADHD, Cocaine abuse, Schizophrenia, Vitamin B12 deficiency and many others.

For a much more serious take on opera and illnesses, we recommend reading Opera: Desire, Disease, Death, by University of Toronto Faculty members Linda and Michael Hutcheon.

1: Puccini: La Boheme, Character: Mimi

  • Act III: Her pinched cheeks are flushed. – Symptom: Blushed cheeks
  • Act III: A terrible cough shakes her chest.  – Symptom: Chest congestion
  • Act IV: I am so cold!  – Symptom: Chills
  • Act IV: It’s just a little cough! I’m used to it.  – Symptom: Cough
  • Act IV: You were frightened and nervous! Then you lost your key.  – Symptom: Short-term memory loss

Mimi

2: Mozart: Don Giovanni, Character: Don Giovanni

  • Act I: Beware my anger, fly! Die he must! – Symptom: Aggression
  • Act I: Well, speak what would you tell me? Say it quickly.  – Symptom: Irritability
  • Act I: This very instant I will make you my wife.  – Symptom: Impulsiveness
  • Act II: Give up the women! Mad man, They’re my first necessity of life, More than the bread that feeds me, Or the air I am breathing.  – Symptom: Increased sexual libido
  • Act II: Who on me is to attend? Wine here!  – Symptom: Alcohol cravings

Don

3: Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro, Character: Figaro

  • Act I: I burn to hear the rest: Doubts and suspicions Freeze my blood.  – Symptom: Paranoia
  • Act II: I lost my nerve and jumped, Down in terror and wrenched a muscle in my foot!  –Symptom: Acute foot pain
  • Act IV: Am I awake or dreaming? – Symptom: Confusion
  • Act IV: Here I kneel at your feet, My heart full of fire. – Symptom: Heartburn

Figaro

4: Verdi: Aida, Character: Aida

  • Act I: I tremble! – Symptom: Trembling
  • Act I: Fatal love, terrible love, break my heart, make me die!  – Symptom: Suicidal thoughts
  • Act II: The gods were always against me. – Symptom: Paranoia
  • Act IV: (In a delirium) Do you see? Death’s radiant angel hastens toward us, and carries us to eternal joy upon his golden wings. – Symptom: Delirium

Aida

 

5: Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor, Character: Lucia

  • Act I: That fountain…ah…I never see it without shivering. – Symptom: Shivering
  • Act II: A mist is before my eyes! – Symptom: Vision problems
  • Act II: I freeze and burn. I feel faint. – Symptom: Light-headedness

Lucia

LUDWIG VAN TORONTO

Want more updates on classical music and opera news and reviews? Follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter for all the latest.

Michael Vincent
Follow me

Michael Vincent

Michael Vincent is the Editor-in-chief Ludwig Van and CEO of Museland Media. He publishes regularly and writes occasionally. He has worked as a senior editor for over fifteen years and is a former freelance classical music critic for the Toronto Star. Michael holds a Doctorate in Music from the University of Toronto.
Michael Vincent
Follow me
Michael Vincent
Follow me

Michael Vincent

Michael Vincent is the Editor-in-chief Ludwig Van and CEO of Museland Media. He publishes regularly and writes occasionally. He has worked as a senior editor for over fifteen years and is a former freelance classical music critic for the Toronto Star. Michael holds a Doctorate in Music from the University of Toronto.
Michael Vincent
Follow me
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300
comments powered by Disqus

Ludwig Van Toronto

REPORT | New Study Argues For More Improvisation In Classical Music

By Anya Wassenberg on July 2, 2019

A recent study by Imperial College London and the Guildhall School of Music & Drama in the UK provides a convincing argument for improvisation in classical music.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300

FEATURE | Music And The Happiness Curve — Fulfilling The Dreams Of Adult Amateurs

By Robin Roger on July 5, 2019

A look at how the Toronto Summer Community Academy fills an essential need for serious music students who want to keep learning.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article

MAJOR CHORDS | Exploring An Immersive Future In Classical Music

By Anya Wassenberg on July 9, 2019

A look at how virtual reality technology is opening up entirely new ways of thinking about, and experiencing classical music.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_low_590x300
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700

We have detected that you are using an adblocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we earn by the advertisements is used to manage this website. Please whitelist our website in your adblocking plugin.