DESKTOP
TABLET (max. 1024px)
MOBILE (max. 640px)
Return to Top
Ludwig Van
Toronto Montreal

PREVIEW | Pavlo Hunka Spearheads Toronto's Inaugural Ukrainian Art Song Summer Institute

By Joseph So on August 8, 2017

Pavlo Hunka (Photo courtesy UASP)
Pavlo Hunka (Photo courtesy UASP)

For Toronto art song lovers, the summer of 2017 is particularly bountiful. Last month, we had the good fortune of hearing Finnish soprano Soile Isokoski in recital, who was here to mentor young artists in the Toronto Summer Music Festival Art of Song program. Now we welcome back British-Ukrainian bass-baritone Pavlo Hunka, who is in town to spearhead the inaugural Ukrainian Art Song Summer Institute (Aug. 7—13) at the Royal Conservatory’s Telus Centre For Performance and Learning.

Pavlo Hunka is, of course, a familiar figure to Toronto opera lovers. He has sung with distinction as guest artist with the Canadian Opera Company: as Falstaff, Hunding, Alberich, Wozzeck, Golaud, and Siskov in Janacek’s From the House of the Dead. A frequent visitor to Toronto, he is the founder of the Ukrainian Art Song Project, established in 2004. The goal of the UASP is to introduce to the music world the vast treasures of Ukrainian art song. Under the stewardship of Hunka, UASP will record and publish over 1,000 art songs by more than 26 Ukrainian composers.

Hunka was in Toronto last March to give a recital of Ukrainian art songs based on texts by William Shakespeare and Ukrainian poet Taras Shevchenko—I interviewed him at the time about his plans for the Summer Institute. The Institute offers an intensive immersion into the Ukrainian art song repertoire: nine young emerging artists are participating—Natalya Gennadi, Laura McAlpine, Viktoriia Melnyk, Tasha Meisami-Farivar, Andrew Skitko, Oleksandra Verzole, David McCune, Ariane Meredith, and Taras Chmil. The faculty includes Hunka, pianist Albert Krywolt, ensemble conductor Melanie Turgeon, and pianist Robert Kortgaard.

Each participant will be given a collection of 32 art songs to be rehearsed during the week, culminating in a public concert on August 13. The concert program includes works by Lysenko, Stetsenko, Stepovyi, Sichynsky, Turkewich, Liudekvich, and Nyzhankivsky. Masterclasses are open to the public and free of charge, with registration; tickets to the concert on August 13 can purchased at the RCM box office. This is an exciting opportunity for fans of art songs to hear up-and-coming artists. Further details on the Ukrainian Art Song Project’s activities can be found here.

For more CLASSICAL MUSIC NEWS, visit HERE.

Want more updates on Toronto-centric classical music news and reviews before anyone else finds out? Follow us on Facebook or Twitter for all the latest.

Joseph So

Joseph So

Joseph So is Professor Emeritus at Trent University and Associate Editor of Opera Canada.He is also a long-time contributor to La Scena Musicale and Opera (London, UK). His interest in music journalism focuses on voice, opera as well as symphonic and piano repertoires. He appears regularly as a panel member of the Big COC Podcast.He has co-edited a book, Opera in a Multicultural World: Coloniality, Culture, Performance, published by Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group).
Joseph So
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300
comments powered by Disqus

Ludwig Van Toronto

ZERO IN | Esprit Orchestra And Soundstreams Celebrate 35 Side-by-side With Claude Vivier

By Hye Won Cecilia Lee on October 14, 2017

Esprit Orchestra and Soundstreams celebrate their 35th season openers at Koerner Hall, side-by-side, resonating in spirituality, pulsing rhythms and exploration of colours.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300

ZERO IN | Pocket Concerts To Get Jazzy With David Braid

By Rick Barrantes on September 26, 2017

Pocket Concerts co-artistic director Rory McLeod chats about their season launch with renowned Jazz pianist David Braid.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article

RECORD KEEPING | Karajan’s Ring Gets The High End Audio Treatment

By Paul E. Robinson on September 24, 2017

While Deutsche Grammophon's new audiophile quality Karajan release is a welcome addition to his Ring legacy, it suffers in more ways than one.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_low_590x300
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700

We have detected that you are using an adblocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we earn by the advertisements is used to manage this website. Please whitelist our website in your adblocking plugin.