DESKTOP
TABLET (max. 1024px)
MOBILE (max. 640px)
Return to Top
Ludwig Van
Toronto Montreal

SCRUTINY | Conductor And Soloist Try The Soft Sell With The TSO

By Arthur Kaptainis on June 4, 2016

Toronto Symphony’s Daphnis et Chloé fulfills expectations with soloist Pekka Kuusisto and conductor Juanjo Mena.

Pekka Kuusisto, Juanjo Mena (Photo Emma Badame)
Pekka Kuusisto, Juanjo Mena (Photo Emma Badame)

Toronto Symphony Orchestra with Juanjo Mena (conductor), Pekka Kuusisto (soloist) and The Toronto Mendelssohn Choir at Roy Thomson Hall. 

Expectation and fulfillment: We get a bit of each every day, and giant helpings whenever an orchestra like the Toronto Symphony programs Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloé as a complete ballet. This score is languorous and lavish in equal measure, and if the first of two performances in Roy Thomson Hall under the baton of Juanjo Mena was a little heavy on the languor, the emphatic moments had their properly fulfilling effect.

This was a technically accomplished account, with distinguished individual contributions, above all from the luminous flute of Nora Shulman in the Pantomime section of Part 3. Everywhere the soundscape was clear, if not always sensuous. There were added layers from the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir, which perhaps could have played a larger role in the great climax of Daybreak.

One imagistic highlight was the incursion of brass instruments (successfully impersonating menacing pirates) on the soft wordless chorus of Part 2. Yet I must report on a few sleepy patches in Part 1 and Mena’s tendency here and there (with his long wingspan) to stretch the tempo and lower the volume more than was necessary or advisable. Even the opening was hard to detect amid the coughs of a few unpaid supernumeraries in the (rather small) crowd.

Pekka Kuusisto (Photo: Emma Badame)
Pekka Kuusisto (Photo: Emma Badame)

Before intermission, we heard Carl Nielsen’s Violin Concerto with Pekka Kuusisto in the title role. This Danish composer’s style is fundamentally boisterous, but both soloist and conductor seemed determined to make a delicate thing of the score. There were notable moments of introspection (and fine tone) in the cadenza of the finale (the only movement with a truly self-perpetuating tune). Mena evoked rich textures. All the same, the performance seemed out of step with the extraversion of the music. 

Not that the audience shared my reservations. Robust applause led to a modest Bach invention played in tandem with principal cello Joseph Johnson. The program began with the brief but evocative Intermezzo from Enrique Granados’s Goyescas, which featured soulful work by the cellos in the early going.

Broadcaster Tom Allen led an onstage introduction to Daphnis that included an interview of Mena, a native of the Basque Country who is convinced that the music of this region inspired Ravel’s off-kilter time signatures. All this was interesting, but a clearer rendering in the program of the narrative elements of the ballet (in a sufficiently illuminated hall) would have been an even better aid to pleasure and comprehension.

#LUDWIGVAN

Want more updates on Toronto-centric classical music news and review before anyone else finds out? Get our exclusive newsletter here and follow us on Facebook for all the latest.

Arthur Kaptainis

Arthur Kaptainis has been the classical music critic of the Montreal Gazette since 1986 and wrote for the National Post 2010-2016. His articles have appeared in Classical Voice North America and La Scena Musicale as well as Ludwig Van. Arthur holds an MA in musicology from the University of Toronto.

Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300
comments powered by Disqus

Ludwig Van Toronto

SCRUTINY | Toronto Dance Theatre’s House Mix Is A Tour De Force

By Paula Citron on February 12, 2020

In summary, House Mix is a monumental tour de force of dance, TDT’s final presentation at the Fleck Dance Theatre under the artistic directorship of Christopher House who is stepping down in August.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300

CRITIC'S PICKS | 10 Concerts You Absolutely Need To See In Toronto (Feb. 3 - 9)

By Joseph So on February 3, 2020

Classical music and opera events happening in and around Toronto for the week of February 3 to 9.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article

SCRUTINY | Toronto Symphony Stop To Smell The Roses For Mozart 40

By Stephan Bonfield on January 23, 2020

All you need to perform Mozart's Symphony No. 40 is 40 players, it turns out.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_low_590x300
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700

We have detected that you are using an adblocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we earn by the advertisements is used to manage this website. Please whitelist our website in your adblocking plugin.