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Ludwig Van
Toronto Montreal

Busted! Beethoven did not keep conducting the Ninth after the music stopped

By John Terauds on January 17, 2014

beethoven

Our digitally connected age is amazingly good at illuminating dark places. It is even better at perpetuating lies — some of which are centuries old.

John Terauds

John Terauds, Editor-Emeritus of Ludwig van Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at the University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.

Australia’s excellent Limelight magazine, which has remade itself into an richly populated source of all sorts of interesting arts news and information with an especially strong presence for opera and art music, this week published an excellent compilation of the classical world’s urban myths.

Some of them are true; some aren’t.

Because Limelight is Australian, it includes the country’s iconic composer Percy Grainger, with some personal details about his life I feel I would’ve been better off not knowing. But are all of those details true?

“Classical Music Mythbusters” is light and enlightening reading for a winter weekend.

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds, Editor-Emeritus of Ludwig van Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at the University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.
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Ludwig Van Toronto

REPORT | Streaming Music, The Song Economy And Classical Music

By Anya Wassenberg on March 10, 2020

Albums are falling by the wayside as the "song economy" takes over the music industry — but where does it leave classical music lovers?
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FEATURE | B-A-C-H, Glazunov’s Dog, And Brahms’ Lost Loves — A Look At Music Cryptography

By Anya Wassenberg on March 17, 2020

Musical cryptography is the use of music to encode messages. In its simplest form, the letters A through G can be used to spell out words or codes.
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