DESKTOP
TABLET (max. 1024px)
MOBILE (max. 640px)
Return to Top
Ludwig Van
Toronto Montreal

Too many people worry too much about preparing for a classical concert

By John Terauds on November 15, 2012

No matter what you call it, this old Parisian building will be just as beautiful.

I’ve been following the Facebook updates from two friends who, thanks to a conference, are in Paris for the first time. Their adventures have provided me with an apt metaphor of how we should treat art music.

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds, Editor-Emeritus of Ludwig van Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at the University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.
John Terauds

Without the benefit of reading or research, these two people are simply wandering from quarter to quarter, taking pictures that include “a beautiful old church” as well as some creative graffiti in forgotten little alcoves.

They don’t actually care about the history of a building or a street, but they are thoroughly enjoying their hours of walking.

This is the same way a lot of people experience art music for the first time.

Like more diligent tourists, many first-time classical concert goers worry whether or not they know enough about what they’re going to hear to be able to enjoy it properly.

Those of us who could act as guides should, I think, encourage newcomers to chill and, instead of worrying about preparation, behave like my two acquaintances and enjoy the experience.

Like most people who give Paris a chance, my guess is that this couple will return for more in their own time, in their own way.

Isn’t that what we we wish for art music, as well?

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds, Editor-Emeritus of Ludwig van Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at the University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.
John Terauds
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300
comments powered by Disqus

Ludwig Van Toronto

THE SCOOP | New Movement Launched To Rebrand “Classical Music” As “Old Popular Music” 

By Michael Vincent on April 1, 2019

Old pop isn’t just the nickname of your cool uncle in Williamsburg, it’s also the name of a new campaign to rebrand classical music in Toronto.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300

SCRUTINY | Toronto Gets A First Hand Account Of Why Mariam Batsashvili Is So Special

By Joseph So on April 8, 2019

Women’s Musical Club of Toronto presented young piano phenom Mariam Batsashvili for her Canadian debut, leaving just about everyone on their feet.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article

SCRUTINY | Richard Goode Was Good Beethoven, Most Of The Time

By Arthur Kaptainis on April 8, 2019

The ingredients, Sunday afternoon, were there: Koerner Hall, a big crowd, a program of late Beethoven and an American pianist of high repute, Richard Goode, who had the wherewithal to realize the glories of this special repertory. Most of the time.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_low_590x300
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700

We have detected that you are using an adblocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we earn by the advertisements is used to manage this website. Please whitelist our website in your adblocking plugin.