DESKTOP
TABLET (max. 1024px)
MOBILE (max. 640px)
Return to Top
Ludwig Van
Toronto Montreal

Album review: Pianist Andras Schiff scales the mountainside of J.S. Bach's Well Tempered Clavier

By John Terauds on September 25, 2012

ANDRAS SCHIFF
J.S. Bach, the Well Tempered Clavier (ECM)

One of several monuments Johann Sebastian Bach left to the world of music is the collection of 48 Preludes and Fugues contained in the two volumes of The Well Tempered Clavier.

As with so much Bach wrote, these pieces are theoretical explorations in composition, practical exercises for the keyboard player and pieces to be enjoyed as music — both by the person making it, and the one who happens to be listening.

When confronted as a whole, these 96 pieces — two preludes and two fugues for each of the 12 major and 12 minor keys — also presents an incredible exercise in perspective from all concerned. It’s like confronting an Old Master painting in a gallery, which can be viewed one way from the bench, with the amount of detail changing the view as one approaches and gets close enough to see each stroke of the brush or palette knife.

One thing is clear: Bach never intended these pieces to be played or listened to in one, continuous sitting. But we Moderns can’t resist climbing impossible peaks, and so the great pianists record complete cycles and program them in recitals, to encourage us to share in the climb — and the potential vistas if it happens to be a clear day.

Hungarian-British pianist Andras Schiff has attempted this particular trek before, but felt, for whatever reason, that he needed to do it again.

What we get is an impeccably balanced, carefully measured journey through Bach’s limitless imagination. It’s an effort that commands respect, but not necessarily love.

Schiff, who has been playing these pieces for the bulk of his long career, has taken each Prelude and Fugue, assigned it a character and then laid it out with uncanny precision. He uses no pedal, keeping the sound direct, close.

Intellectually and technically, this 4-CD box is a coup. But, emotionally, it is like spending a weekend poring over balance sheets with an accountant.

The modern piano offer a virtually limitless number of options to the interpreter. Not exploring the full dynamic possibilities of the instrument is as much a choice as deciding to play these pieces with all sorts of pianistic embellishments of legato, dynamic shifts and pedal work to sustain certain harmonics.

Schiff wants us to hear the notes in detail and, as the perspective shifts, appreciate the subtle changes in texture and tempo and overall feel of each key as we move from prelude to fugue and back to prelude again. This is a huge accomplishment.

But, when all is heard, I have to admit I prefer a more interventionist pianist, someone like Angela Hewitt, who I believe provides the modern listener with the most dramatic perspective of all: the option of experiencing these exercises purely as beautiful music, complete with finger-spoken commentary, nuance and the pacing of an accomplished storyteller.

For all the details on this album, click here.

Here is an instructive backgrounder video on the album, released by ECM:

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds, the founder of Musical Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.
John Terauds
John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds, the founder of Musical Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.
John Terauds
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300
comments powered by Disqus

Ludwig Van Toronto

RECORD KEEPING | We Can't Forget Montreal Symphony's Saint-Saëns

By Paul E. Robinson on October 11, 2017

This is a terrific recording and deserves attention.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300

LISZTS | 5 Events To See Tonight At Nuit Blanche

By Michael Vincent on September 30, 2017

Our top five picks for music-related art installations tonight at the 12th annual Nuit Blanche.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article

THE SCOOP | Move Over Hockey, Study Shows Singing Is Canada’s National Pastime

By Michael Vincent on October 2, 2017

Choral Canada has released a public census report that suggests there are about 50% more adult choral singers in Canada than adult Hockey players. 
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_low_590x300
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700

We have detected that you are using an adblocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we earn by the advertisements is used to manage this website. Please whitelist our website in your adblocking plugin.