DESKTOP
TABLET (max. 1024px)
MOBILE (max. 640px)
Return to Top
Ludwig Van
Toronto Montreal

Einstein on the Beach success may be due to audiences willing to enter and get lost

By John Terauds on March 18, 2012

A scene from the Opéra de Montpellier revival of Philip Glass's Einstein on the Beach, which opened Friday night. It arrives at the Sony Centre for three performances, starting June 8 (Lucie Jansch photo for Le Figaro).

“You don’t have to understand anything. It is a work where you can go and get lost,” says Robert Wilson of his Einstein on the Beach, the opera he co-created with composer Philip Glass.

Einstein is set to have its Canadian premiere on June 8, at this year’s Luminato festival. This revival, which had its first public performance in Montpellier, France, on Friday night, is intended to take the opera to places it hasn’t been since its 1976 premiere (also in France).

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds, Editor-Emeritus of Ludwig van Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at the University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.
John Terauds

It is an opportunity to experience live a rare modern-day example of an opera that has gone from controversial to iconic in the space of a single generation.

Has Einstein been so successful because we don’t have to understand anything, and all we have to do is go and get lost?

I wonder how many people who buy tickets for a new piece of music or theatre, or who buy a novel from a first-time author — any situation where one can’t see beyond the curtain or the cover until the act of engaging with the creator(s) has begun — are able to commit such a leap of faith?

With Twitter and Facebook, the reactions come in real time, now, so, really, how many of us truly arrive with no understanding, these days?

But arriving prepared to get lost is possible. While that may not be the best of strategies while shopping for groceries, I think it’s an amazing way to approach art.

For most, it requires a strong act of will to approach  performances with hope and trust that the creators and interpreters will take us where we need to go. And just imagine how much planning and preparation artists have had to do in order to accomplish this.

I suspect that, as many of us think about getting new audiences interested in the performing arts, we should aim at fostering a sense of ease and security among the curious.

An old sign outside Honest Ed’s has beckoned “Come in and get lost,” for decades. It’s a good start.

The Luminato website is currently down. There are three performances of Einstein on the Beach at the Sony Centre, starting  June 8.

+++

Here is a bit of background on the Einstein revival from Nonesuch records (which has re-released its 1993 recording). If you can read French, there’s an article in Le Figaro on the Montpellier revival, and how the year-long enterprise was helped along by Opéra de Montpellier general director, Jean-Paul ­Scarpitta, who helped raise the 750,000 euro needed to get it off the ground in only three months.

Here’s the official 2012 Einstein on the Beach trailer, from where I got Wilson’s words:

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds, Editor-Emeritus of Ludwig van Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at the University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.
John Terauds
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300
comments powered by Disqus

Ludwig Van Toronto

SCRUTINY | Fantasy Meets Fabulous Vocalism In A Winning COC Rusalka

By Joseph So on October 14, 2019

Sondra Radvanovsky, an impeccable orchestra, and fanciful staging make COC's Rusalka a not-to-be-missed highlight of the opera season.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_high_590x300

SCRUTINY | Margaret Trudeau Charms In Candid Autobiographical ‘A Certain Woman Of An Age’

By Paula Citron on September 21, 2019

For ninety minutes, the charming Trudeau reveals the good, the bad and the ugly, and it is compelling stuff with name-dropping galore and delicious insider tidbits. Yet at all times Trudeau is direct, honest and open, and that is how she wins our hearts and minds.
Read the full story Comments
Share this article

SCRUTINY | Superb Performances And Intelligent Writing Bring Two Icons To Life In ‘Piaf/Dietrich’

By Paula Citron on September 27, 2019

Louise Pitre and Jayne Lewis embody the iconic characters, their magic, and their complicated relationship in the Mirvish production of ‘Piaf/Dietrich — A Legendary Affair’
Read the full story Comments
Share this article
lv_toronto_banner_low_590x300
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700
lv_toronto_ssb_atf_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_high_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_mid_300x300
lv_toronto_ssb_low_300x300
lv_toronto_tsb_high_300x700
lv_toronto_tsb_low_300x700

We have detected that you are using an adblocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we earn by the advertisements is used to manage this website. Please whitelist our website in your adblocking plugin.