Ludwig Van Toronto's Daily Arts & Culture News

FILTER NEWS BY

Q&A | Director Rob Kempson Talks About Electric Messiah 2020

Soundstreams' Electric Messiah 2020 (Photo: Dahlia Katz)
Soundstreams’ Electric Messiah 2020 (Photo: Dahlia Katz)

Though nothing much has changed for the classics themselves, having lived in what must be the weirdest year in decades, we are no longer able to hold our canons in the way we used to. The traditions of gathering, sharing and performing are not presently available, we keep shuffling away from one another to keep a good distance, and dark concert halls are filled with deafening silence. However, never a stranger to innovation and metamorphosis, Soundstreams’ Electric Messiah 2020, promises us a renewed junction, connecting us to our beloved tradition of Christmastide Messiah.

A playlist of the familiar tunes such as Comfort Ye and Ev’ry Valley will be intermixed with new takes — including compositions by Slowpitch Sound and Libydo, and a new commission by Ian Cusson, O Death, O Grave. Even the tunes we think we know have been transformed by musicians who dug deep to make personal contributions through making arrangements and adding spoken words. In a sense, Soundstreams is staying quite traditional to themselves “As in past years, we once again look at the material with a new lens,” said Director Rob Kempson.

Taking the Messiah out of the Drake Underground, Rob and the crew created a full-length digital concert, where the pre-recorded audio will be presented with visuals filmed around Toronto. We asked Rob a few questions about Electric Messiah 2020.

Robert Kempson directs Soundstreams' Electric Messiah 2020 (Photo: Dahlia Katz)
Rob Kempson directs Soundstreams’ Electric Messiah 2020 (Photo: Dahlia Katz)

How did it all fall into place in this strange year? Where did you go to create, having to walk away from the familiar Drake Underground?

I’ve been lucky enough to be involved with Electric Messiah since 2017. I’ve directed the show for the last two years in the Drake Underground, and when we realized that wasn’t going to be possible this year, the Soundstreams team leapt into action. Every single aspect of what we do has had to be reimagined, and the incredible Emma Fowler (at Soundstreams) has had to manage an avalanche of new logistical considerations. When we eventually arrived at the idea of making a film, I began sourcing locations by visiting some of the places that I had found inspiring during my summer of pandemic walks. There are lots of underappreciated sights in our own city, so I wanted to share some of those with the audience.

What was it like for you to direct EM, from live performance to a 50-minute-long film project?

I have never directed a film before, so I was really excited to learn and grow as a director in this medium. However, I don’t really think of this as a “short” music project, since the final film will run at just over an hour. Each number of the show was filmed in a different location throughout the city; it was a massive undertaking, and we planned it all to be shot in only three days!

Since the pandemic hit, I have been involved in a number of online theatre/film hybrid projects. Some of these have been performed live and some pre-recorded. Regardless of the exact medium, I have loved exploring what’s possible with multiple locations. As we spend so much time in our homes these days, the outside world (and different spaces) feel particularly exciting. I have so enjoyed exploring my city in these last nine months, then finding the right location for each of these numbers, and working with our cinematographer (Blake Hannahson) to create the right shot for our staging.

What does Messiah mean to you, especially in relation to Christmas?

I have sung bits of the Messiah for as long as I can remember. People like to think of it as a “classic,” but that’s only because it has been selected over and over again by the ruling class. To me, the Messiah represents a great jumping off point for exploration. It is familiar in some way to many people, but that familiarity asks to be juxtaposed against something new and innovative. Electric Messiah does just that; this project makes a case for the contemporary relevance of the Messiah, and that’s what I think all performance must do all of the time… Is it “Christmas”? I mean, Handel would tell you that it’s mostly about Easter, but I think at this point, the world has chosen to re-write that narrative a bit.

Treble Teiya Kasahara in Soundstreams' Electric Messiah 2020 (Photo: Dahlia Katz)
Treble Teiya Kasahara in Soundstreams’ Electric Messiah 2020 (Photo: Dahlia Katz)

Having sung it personally, how did that experience influence your shaping of EM?

Personally, I can remember the first time I ever sang Ev’ry Valley — and it was at the church where I grew up. I had worked so hard on getting every note just right; the thing about that kind of detailed work is that it stays with you. At this point in my life, I could sing most of the score from memory, so I am particularly grateful to get to work on a project where we deconstruct that very score and ask questions about it from within.

If you could’ve asked for a Christmas gift for this production, what would it be?

Time. Budget is always just an opportunity to buy more time.

But that’s not a very fun answer. There are a few places where we would have liked to film that we couldn’t access because of budget, but to be honest, I think I’m happier in the end with the places we ended up. I guess the only other thing would be to have had a costume designer. I did a bunch of coordination with our very accommodating singers, so they look GREAT, but it would have been fun to see how a designer might interpret this work as well.

How is Christmas 2020 different for you, from all the other years?

So many Christmas traditions won’t be the same this year. My number one is the annual Christmas carolling party which I have hosted for the last 15 years with my best friend. My friends and I gather together (now with their children and spouses) to sing carols with whatever instruments and harmonies we manage at the time. You simply can’t replace the magic of singing together in the same room. It’s generally my favourite day of the whole year, so I’m really missing that this holiday season.

Any words for the audience at home?

I hope that this film can remind people of the great gifts we have in this city, in music, and in one another. I hope that this film is not a reminder of what we’re going through, but rather an escape from it. Electric Messiah has always been about re-invention, so this project is simply the 2020 expression of that idea.

When you sit down to watch EM2020, what drink would you have in your hand?

My go-to is an ice-cold glass of white wine, but to get myself in the mood, I think it’ll be a good old-fashioned hot toddy this year.

***

Soundstreams’ Electric Messiah, “a cinematic love letter to the city of Toronto, where we reflect this well-known music through the filter of our contemporary world,” will be streamed on 17 December 2020, at 8 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. Details.

#LUDWIGVAN

Get the daily arts news straight to your inbox.

Sign up for the Ludwig van Daily — classical music and opera in five minutes or less HERE.

Q&A | 30 Questions For Principal Dancer Of The National Ballet Greta Hodgkinson

Greta Hodgkinson (Photo courtesy of the National Ballet)
Greta Hodgkinson (Photo: Karolina Kuras)

Ludwig Van’s Q&A series is comprised of a bank of questions aimed at artists who have made a serious mark on the arts scene in Toronto. They pick and choose. The minimum response is 20 answers.

For nearly 30 years, Principal Dancer Greta Hodgkinson has been a fixture at Canada’s premiere ballet company. First joining the National Ballet in 1990, Greta quickly rose to fame as Principal Dancer on 1996. An artist acclaimed for her dazzling technical virtuosity, dramatic intensity and articulate characterization, she is the complete ballerina par excellence. Greta Hodgkinson has performed every leading role in the classical repertoire and her talents extend to the contemporary repertoire as well.

Her farewell performances are coming up: she will dance the seminal role of Marguerite in Frederick Ashton’s Marguerite and Armand. This production, which was acquired in Greta’s honour by Karen Kain and the National Ballet, makes its company premiere February 29 – March 7, 2020. After that, Greta will appear in Crypto (by her National Ballet colleague and frequent partner Guillaume Côté) for Canadian Stage.

— — — — —

What are three things about Toronto that make you want to live here?

Quality of life, it’s diversity and restaurants

Your drink/cocktail of choice?

Wine (white: Sancerre or Sauvignon Blanc/ red: Bordeaux)

Your favourite sound?

My kids laughing

Your least favourite sound?

My kids crying

First thing that comes to your mind when you think about Toronto.

Home

The dumbest thing that you’ve ever done to your hair?

I tried to go blonde and it ruined my hair

Where was the last place you traveled to for work or pleasure?

Cruise to the Caribbean

What is your biggest phobia?

Claustrophobia

Where did you go to school?

Canada’s National Ballet School

Signature meal to cook at home?

Pasta pomodoro / eggplant parmigiana

Summer or winter?

Summer

The cliché that you overuse?

“Everything happens for a reason”

The last show you binge watched?

The Crown, Afterlife

Shoe of choice?

Sneakers

The different career path that you could have gone on?

Being a chef

Your ancestry?

Armenian/ English, French Canadian

What did you dress up for Halloween when you were a kid?

Wonder Woman

Television show that you could tolerate re-runs of?

The Office

Your major character flaw?

Impatience/Perfectionism

The character flaw in others that you can’t abide?

No sense of humour

What are you the most proud of?

My family

What is the best thing about your work?

Performing

What is the worst thing about your work?

Physical pain

The talent that you wish you possessed?

A gorgeous singing voice

What are you listening to as you answer these questions?

A discussion about shows on Netflix

What musical instrument do you secretly long to play?

Piano (it’s not so secret)

What sport did you give up and why?

Ice skating, in order to pursue ballet

The thing that makes you the angriest?

Ignorance

The first three things that you do every morning?

Make coffee, get my son breakfast, check my phone for messages

The best way to die?

In your sleep

To read more from our Q&A Series, click HERE.

#LUDWIGVAN

Want more updates on classical music and opera news and reviews? Follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter for all the latest.

Q&A | 20 Questions For Sheku Kanneh-Mason

Sheku Kanneh-Mason
Sheku Kanneh-Mason (Photo: Jake Turney)

Ludwig Van’s Q&A series is comprised of a bank of questions aimed at artists who have made a serious mark on the classical music scene. They pick and choose. The minimum response is 20 answers.

For Royal watchers and classical music lovers alike, it was hard not to notice the extraordinary performance by cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason at the Royal wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex in 2018. His appearance was seen by over two billion viewers and took the world by storm. His debut record for Decca Classics, Inspiration, reached No. 1 on the classical charts and No. 18 on the UK Album charts and has been streamed over 2.5 million times on Spotify. Kanneh-Mason’s latest album featuring Elgar’s Cello Concerto with the London Symphony Orchestra and Sir Simon Rattle is out now. If the critics are right, this is an artist becoming become synonymous with the cello.

— — — — — — —

Your first memory?

Being in Bahrain, where I was born, at a kids park. I think I was 2 or 3.

What are three things about playing the cello that make you love it?

The sound, the repertoire that has been written for cello and the fact you can sit down whilst playing!

Most memorable gig ever?

Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg, because of the new space – it’s one of the best concert halls I’ve ever seen.

Your role models?

Jacqueline du Pre and Bob Marley

If you could board a plane this afternoon, where would it be taking you?

Antigua because I have lots of family there and right now the weather is lovely there (as opposed to cold here in London)

Where was the last place you travelled to for work or pleasure?

Perth in Scotland for a concert with my quintet. It’s a nice town, very small. It’s nice to get out of London.

What is your biggest phobia?

Small holes (Trypophobia)

Signature meal to cook at home?

Chicken and fried plantain

The last show you binge-watched?

YOU on Netflix.

The different career path that you could have gone on?

I would like to have been a footballer, playing for Arsenal.

Your three favourite films?

Avatar, The Godfather, The Godfather Part II

What are you the most proud of?

I’m most proud of my recording of Elgar’s Cello Concerto

The talent that you wish you possessed?

Swimming

Favourite classical music website

Ludwig Van!

Summer or winter?

Summer

What are you listening to as you answer these questions?

Villa-Lobos

What musical instrument do you secretly long to play?

Basoon

The first album that made you love music?

Jacqueline Du Pre – Elgar Cello Concerto

Three pieces, songs, or arias that you could listen to on repeat for an hour?

Mozart Requiem, Mozart piano concerto no 20 and Time Will Tell by Bob Marley.

The piece of music you want played at your funeral?

Rachmaninoff Elegie for cello and piano.

To read more from our Q&A Series, click HERE.

#LUDWIGVAN

Want more updates on classical music and opera news and reviews? Follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter for all the latest.

Q&A | 21 Questions For Rea Beaumont

Toronto-born pianist, educator, and composer Rea Beaumont
Toronto-born pianist, educator, and composer Rea Beaumont sits down with Ludwig Van to chat about phobias, alternate career paths, and favourite TV shows.

Ludwig Van’s Q&A series is comprised of a bank of questions aimed at artists who have made a serious mark on Toronto’s music scene. They pick and choose. The minimum response is 20 answers. A kind of Rorschach personality test, if you will.

Toronto-born pianist, educator, and composer Rea Beaumont is an artist dedicated to discovery. Her creative practice centres at the forefront of Canadian piano repertoire, and includes collaborations with R. Murray Schafer, Barbara Pentland, Oskar Morawetz, Jordan Nobles and Jordan Pal.

Beaumont is an alumnus of the University of Toronto, University of British Columbia, RCM, Eastman School of Music, and The Banff Centre for the Arts, and holds a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Piano and Conducting.

Her critically acclaimed album, Timeless features works by Philip Glass, John Adams, Jordan Nobles, Srul Irving Glick, Rea Beaumont, Jordan Pal. Full details here.

What are three things about Toronto that make you want to live here?

1. I am a Torontonian, this is where I grew up and it is my home town with the people closest to me.
2. The city is continually evolving with new buildings, ideas, and traditions.
3. Toronto has one of the best arts and entertainment scenes and it is great to be a part of it.

What are three things that Toronto doesn’t have but should?

1. A large, downtown park, like New York City’s Central Park where people can gather on the weekend and it becomes a traffic-free zone on Sundays
2. Infrastructure that keeps up with the rate of development
3. A female Mayor in the next election

Name your favourite concert hall/venue anywhere.

Palais Garnier, the Paris Opera House.

Your favourite sound?

Music — great music of all kinds and genres.

Your least favourite sound?

Amber Alert, not just the sound but for what it represents.

The dumbest thing that you’ve ever done to your hair?

Platinum highlights. Sooo bright.

What are the three things you’d like to change about Toronto?

1. I would add relief lines at the main interchange subway stations, one at St. George and the other at Bloor-Yonge.
2. Air conditioning in the subway and on the platforms during the summer.
3. I would do more to protect accessibility at the waterfront. I was in Chicago last year and it is a great example of a pedestrian and bike-friendly space.

Your first three record store purchases

Elvis Presley Blue Hawaii; Maria João Pires Mozart Piano Sonatas; Glenn Gould Bach Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1.

The three books that you read that made an impact on you in your formative years?

Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice; Stephen Leacock Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town; W.O. Mitchell Who Has Seen the Wind.

Where was the last place you traveled to for work or pleasure?

I just returned from performing in our nation’s capital, Ottawa. It was a great place to visit and I would definitely like to go back.

What is your biggest phobia?

Very small airplanes. If I can see the pilot, the plane is too small!

The different career path that you could have gone on?

I was always interested in International Relations and was accepted into a program but I chose music. It could be why my solo albums all highlight global social issues.

Television show that you could tolerate re-runs of?

Seinfeld. They covered every subject you can think of!

The character flaw in others that you can’t abide?

Stereotyping.

What is the best thing about your work?

That I love it! It is an opportunity to discover great repertoire and share it with others. Plus, I have met a lot of great people along the way.

Three pieces, songs, or arias that you could listen to on repeat for an hour?

Ravel: Adagio assai from the Piano Concerto in G
Monteverdi: “Vi ricorda o boschi ombrosi” from L’Orfeo
Saint-Saëns Bacchanale from Samson and Delilah because it was a favourite of mine to conduct as an opener.

What sport did you give up and why?

It’s not a sport but it often feels like one because of the combination of strength, endurance and artistry — ballet. I studied ballet from age 3 but gave it up in my late teens because I was better at piano than dance, but I really enjoyed ballet.

Your favourite word?

Holus-bolus. I first heard the expression when conductor Kerry Stratton, who passed away this year, interviewed me on the radio and I think it is a fabulous word.

Your least favourite word?

Forthwith. Are we going forth or going with?

What is the one animal that scares you the most?

The one that is chasing me.

If you had a motto, what would it be?

My Twitter bio includes the motto: “As the world becomes smaller, you have to think bigger.” With billions of people in the world, you have to create your own niche, your own voice, and live your life to the fullest.

To read more from our Q&A Series, click HERE.

#LUDWIGVAN

Want more updates on classical music and opera news and reviews? Follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter for all the latest.

Q&A | 15 Questions For Lang Lang

Lang Lang interview
Renowned pianist Lang Lang answers 15 questions, including his role models, favourite concert halls, and his motto.

Ludwig Van’s Q&A series is composed of a bank of questions aimed at artists who have made a serious mark on the music scene. They pick and choose. The minimum response is 20 answers. A kind of Rorschach personality test, if you will.

Describing Lang Lang in a short paragraph is an impossible task. His breadth as an artist has long since been decided by his millions of loyal fans as a true superstar of the keyboard. What makes him stand out is just how far he has gone to overcome the technical hurdles of the standard piano repertoire.

The different career path that you could have gone on?

None!

The thing that makes you the happiest?

Being able to share the joy I get from music.

What are you the most proud of?

The work of the Lang Lang International Music Foundation that enables children to get in touch with music and explore their talent.

What is the best thing about your work?

I get the chance to meet and work with so many incredibly gifted and inspiring people from all kinds of backgrounds, like Herbie Hancock or Pharrell Williams, and they can truly enrich one’s perspective.

The talent that you wish you possessed?

I wish I could fly!

What are you listening to as you answer these questions?

The humming sound of airplane engines…

If you had a motto, what would it be?

Share the music!

Your least favourite word?

Wrong.

The best way to die?

Can there be any?

Your least favourite smells?

Burnt pizza.

Your role models?

Vladimir Horowitz and Leonard Bernstein

Your favourite smells?

Fresh herbal tea and homemade food

Where was the last place you travelled to for work or pleasure?

I travelled to the Vatican to play for the pope

If you could board a plane this afternoon, where would it be taking you?

To Hainan in China — straight to their beautiful beaches

Name your favourite concert hall/venue anywhere.

Musikverein in Vienna, the Golden Hall. Its sound is magnificent

To read more from our Q&A Series, click HERE.

LUDWIG VAN TORONTO

Want more updates on classical music and opera news and reviews? Follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter for all the latest.

Q&A | 10 Questions For Alison Yun-Fei Jiang (video edition)

Alison Yun-Fei Jiang
Ludwig Van gets to know composer Alison Yun-Fei Jiang, her recent work, and her thoughts on the trials and tribulations of being a composer.

Canadian composer Alison Yun-Fei Jiang has developed a remarkably strong voice for such a young composer. Drawing inspiration landscapes, poetry, literature, film music, and Chinese traditional opera, she has a flair for dramatic, large gestures.

Just hours after flying in from her home in Chicago where she studies at the University of Chicago, she met up with us to for a Q&A about her upcoming work for the Esprit Orchestra, personal tastes, and the trials and tribulations of being a composer.

Check out the video below:

You can hear her latest work, “Temporal ” performed by the Esprit Orchestra at New Wave Reprise at Trinity St. Paul’s Centre on Friday, April 5, 2019, at 7 pm.

Full details and tickets here: www.espritorchestra.com

—————————————————–

Read more Q&A’s HERE.

Q&A | 15 Questions For Eugene Astapov

Eugene Astapov
Canadian composer Eugene Astapov chats about his work, and the things that make him tick.

Eugene Astapov has enjoyed an unusually busy career for such a young composer. First coming to Canada at age 14 from Crimea USSR, he quickly established himself as a composer with big aspirations, particularly in orchestral music.

He received a bachelor of music in composition from the Eastman School of Music, where he studied with David Liptak. He compleated a masters in composition at Juilliard, studying with Robert Beaser and Christopher Rouse, and received a diploma in piano performance the Royal Conservatory of Toronto. Most recently, he graduated with a Doctor of Musical Arts Degree from the University of Toronto. 

His music has been performed by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Espirit Orchestra, the Penderecki String Quartet, and l’Orchestre de la Francophonie Canadienne, and featured in concerts at Lincoln Center in New York, the Salle Cortot in Paris, the National Arts Center in Ottawa, Sejong Hall in Seoul, the Banff Center (where he was 2014 Composer in Residence), and the Ravinia Music Festival.

We caught up with Astapov to chat about his work, general tastes, and learn more about his day-to-day:

 

You can hear his latest work, “Emblem” performed by the Esprit Orchestra at New Wave Reprise at Trinity St. Paul’s Centre on Friday, April 5, 2019, at 7 pm.

Full details and tickets here: www.espritorchestra.com

—————————————————–

Read more Q&A’s HERE.

Q&A | 10 Questions For Christina Volpini

Christina Volpini
Canadian composer Christina Volpini talks with Ludwig Van about her hot-off-the-press score for Toronto’s Esprit Orchestra, “as within, so without”.

Hamilton Ontario-based composer Christina Volpini is a composer whose style is focused intently on the subtle sounds that fall between the cracks. She has written works for large ensemble, chamber ensembles, soloists, mixed media, live electronics, and film.

Taking a page from composers like Morton Feldman, she uses economy as a vehicle to get to the truth what she wants to say as an artist. Much like her personality, Volpini’s music is introspective and focused on saying more with less.

Lean in, and listen close. You don’t want to miss anything.

You can hear her latest work, “as within, so without” performed by the Esprit Orchestra at New Wave Reprise at Trinity St. Paul’s Centre on Friday, April 5, 2019, at 7 pm.

Full details and tickets here: www.espritorchestra.com

—————————————————–

Read more Q&A’s HERE.

Q&A | 15 Questions For Composer Bekah Simms (video edition)

You don’t need to look far to find composers in Canada propelling classical music into a promising future. One of the brightest lights shining the way is Newfoundland-born, now Toronto-based composer Bekah Simms. Her work “Granitic” is nominated for the 2019 JUNO Award for Classical Composition of the Year. In 2016 the CBC included her among their annual 30 hot classical musicians under 30. Besides composition, she’s also the co-artistic director of Caution Tape Sound Collective which presents concerts of forward-thinking repertoire since 2015. This is a composer you keep your eye on.

 

 

Full details and tickets here: www.espritorchestra.com

—————————————————–

Read more Q&A’s HERE.

Q&A | 20 Questions For Christian Blackshaw

Christian Blackshaw (Photo: Si Barber)
British pianist Christian Blackshaw answers 20 questions, including his signature meal, favourite concert hall, and his role models. (Photo: Si Barber)

Ludwig Van’s Q&A series is composed of a bank of questions aimed at artists who have made a serious mark on Toronto’s cultural scene. 

Christian Blackshaw that rare breed of pianist. His ability to match emotional depth with technique has propelled his career around the world with conductors Valery Gergiev, Sir Simon Rattle, Gianandrea Noseda, Yuri Temirkanov and Sir Neville Marriner. Of his many recorded works, it is his complete Mozart Piano Sonatas series was recorded for Wigmore Hall Live that not only captures your attention, but keeps it. During the 2018/19 season, he is an Artist in Residence at the Wigmore Hall. In 2019 he makes his debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra and Yannick Nezet-Seguin.

 

Mooredale Concerts brings Christian Blackshaw to Walter Hall on March 17, 2019.

—————————————————–

Name your favourite concert hall/ venue anywhere

Wigmore Hall, London and also, Mariinsky Concert Hall, St. Petersburg

Your first three record store purchases

Dinu Lipatti recital, Artur Schnabel Beethoven Sonatas, and Clifford Curzon Schubert D major Sonata, D.850

Three pieces, songs or arias that you could listen to on repeat for an hour?

  1. “Der Abschied” from Das Lied von der Erde of Mahler performed by Kathleen Ferrier, Vienna Philharmonic and Bruno Walter
  2. “Trauere, mein Herz”, Cavatina Act 3 from Oberon by Weber performed by Gundula Janowitz, Deutsche Oper Orchestra and Ferdinand Leitner
  3. “An die Musik” of Franz Schubert performed by Fritz Wunderlich with Hubert Giesen, piano

The first album that made you love music?

Age four, transfixed by The Hebrides Overture, (Fingal’s Cave) by Mendelssohn

Your favourite word?

Yes

Your least favourite word?

Impossible

What is the title and author of the book closest to you right now?

A Gentleman in Moscow (Amor Towles).

If you could board a plane this afternoon, where would it be taking you?

A secret location in Greece

The three books that you read that made an impact on you in your formative years?

The Wind in the Willows (Kenneth Grahame),  Peter Pan (J.M.Barrie),  Childhood, Boyhood, Youth (Leo Tolstoy)

Signature meal to cook at home?

Slow cooked chicken, potatoes, good oil, lemon juice, fresh oregano, fresh thyme, and seasoning — in one pot

What did you major in as an undergraduate?

As I left school at 16, I took three diplomas aged 19 in piano performance, teaching, and graduate studies.

The different career path that you could have gone on?

There was never any doubt of my direction, though if I failed, working with wood or stone would appeal.

Your three favourite films?

Fantasia, Some Like it Hot, and The Lady Vanishes (the black and white Hitchcock)

Your role models?

Musicians I admire include, Sir Clifford Curzon, Maria Callas, and Herbert von Karajan.

The historical personalities, both good and bad, that that fascinate you the most?

There are many, naturally… However, my three have to be: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Franz Schubert, and Robert Schumann

What is the best thing about your work?

Being allowed to inhabit the musical language of composers of genius

What is the worst thing about your work?

Failing in the above

What are you listening to as you answer these questions?

Birdsong

If you had a motto, what would it be?

Forever simpler

Whose musical style do you covet?

It’s not a question to covet. Only to find truth and meaning and the freedom to express.

—————————————————–

Read more Q&A’s HERE.

daily news straight to your inbox by 6 am

company logo
Terms of Service & Privacy Policy
© 2022, Museland Media, Inc., All Rights Reserved.