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Ludwig Van
Toronto Montreal

Classical Music 101: What does period performance mean?

By John Terauds on February 22, 2012

Baroque horn
Modern horn

Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra calls itself a period-instrument orchestra that follows period performance practice. This means that they go back down the evolutionary ladder in the history of musical instruments to play violins, bassoons, oboes and horns (just to name a few) from the time of the composer in question.

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds, the founder of Musical Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.
John Terauds

Nearly every instrument in an orchestra has changed over the past three centuries. Some differences are obvious: a harpsichord, in which the strings are plucked by a mechanical quill, evolved into a piano, where the strings are struck by a felt-padded hammer; the French horn sprouted valves; the bassoon grew larger.

A Baroque violin looks much the same as a modern one from the distance of balcony to stage. Look closely, and you’ll see, among other details, the period violin has gut strings instead of metal ones, the bridge is lower and, most importantly, the player is using a shorter bow.

In every case, the modern instrument makes a bigger, more impressive sound, and often allows the musician to play a wider range of colours and timbres.

But the relative delicacy of older instruments has a charm all of its own.

Just as the instruments are different, so are the techniques to play them properly, especially when the string players have to use shorter bows. Rather than aim for volume of sound, the player has to concentrate on getting the most shape and texture out of it.

Careful — and continuing — scholarship has made it possible for today’s musicians to connect with what be believe are the correct performance styles by European country, and by era.

The popularity of hundreds of period-instrument orchestras and ensembles that present concerts around the world has also helped musicians who play modern instruments lighten up on their interpretations.

Here are two sets of examples, on from the Classical era, one from the Baroque:

1. The third movements of Joseph Haydn’s “Sunrise” Quartet (Op. 76, No. 4), first on modern (Sonus String Quartet), then on period instruments (Quatuor Mosaïques):

2. The opening of J.S. Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 5, first as conducted by Wilhelm Fürtwängler from the piano at the Salzburg Festival in 1950, followed by Glenn Gould doing the same in a CBC studio, versus a period-instrument performance by the Freiburg Baroque Orchestra:

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds

John Terauds, the founder of Musical Toronto, is currently a Divinity student at University of Toronto and a church music director. He joined the Toronto Star in 1988, was the classical music critic from 2005 to 2012, and continues as a freelance critic for the paper. He is the co-author of Roy Thomson Hall: A Portrait, a book written with Toronto Star Colleague, William Littler.
John Terauds
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Ludwig Van Toronto

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